Néstor Osorio (left), Permanent Representative of Colombia to the UN and President of the Security Council for April.
©UN Photo/Evan Schneider

The Security Council,

Recalling its previous resolutions and the statements of its President relating to the situation in Côte d’Ivoire, in particular resolutions 1880 (2009), 1893 (2009), 1911 (2010), 1933 (2010), 1946 (2010), 1962 (2010) and 1975 (2011),

Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and unity of Côte d’Ivoire, and recalling the importance of the principles of good-neighbourliness, non-interference and regional cooperation,

Taking note of the report of the Secretary-General dated 30 March 2011 (S/2011/211), of the 2011 report (S/2011/272) and of the Final 2010 report (S/2011/271) of the United Nations Group of Experts,

Emphasizing the continued contribution to the stability in Côte d’Ivoire of the measures imposed by resolutions 1572 (2004), 1643 (2005) and 1975 (2011) and stressing that these measures aim at supporting the peace process in Côte d’Ivoire,

Welcoming that President Alassane Dramane Ouattara of Côte d’Ivoire is now able to assume all his responsibilities as Head of State, in accordance with the will of the Ivorian people expressed at the presidential elections of 28 November 2010 and as recognized by the international community,

Emphasizing the imperative of sustained efforts by all the Ivorians to promote national reconciliation and consolidation of peace through dialogue and consultation and welcoming the assistance of the African Union (AU) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in this regard,

Recalling its resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) on women, peace and security, its resolutions 1612 (2005) and 1882 (2009) on children and armed conflict and its resolutions 1674 (2006) and 1894 (2009) on the protection of civilians in armed conflicts,

Reiterating its firm condemnation of all violations of human rights and international humanitarian law in Côte d’Ivoire, condemning all violence committed against civilians, including women, children, internally displaced persons and foreign nationals, and other violations and abuses of human rights, in particular enforced disappearances, extrajudicial killings, killing and maiming of children and rapes and other forms of sexual violence and stressing that the perpetrators must be brought to justice,

Stressing the importance for the Group of Experts, originally established pursuant to paragraph 7 of resolution 1584 (2004), to be provided with the sufficient resources for the implementation of its mandate,

Determining that the situation in Côte d’Ivoire continues to pose a threat to international peace and security in the region,

Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

1. Decides to renew until 30 April 2012 the measures on arms and the financial and travel measures imposed by paragraphs 7 to 12 of resolution 1572 (2004), paragraph 5 of resolution 1946 (2010) and paragraph 12 of resolution 1975 (2011) and further decides to renew until 30 April 2012 the measures preventing the importation by any State of all rough diamonds from Côte d’Ivoire imposed by paragraph 6 of resolution 1643 (2005) ;

2. Decides to review the measures renewed in paragraph 1 above in light of the progress achieved in the stabilization throughout the country, the holding of the parliamentary elections and the implementation of the key steps of the peace process, as referred to in resolution 1933 (2010), by the end of the period mentioned in paragraph 1, and decides further to carry out a midterm review of the measures renewed in paragraph 1 above no later than 31 October 2011, with a view to possibly modifying, lifting or maintaining, ahead of 30 April 2012, all or part of the measures of the sanctions regime, in accordance with progress in the peace process, the developments related to Human rights violations and the developments related to the parliamentary elections ;

3. Calls upon all Member States, in particular those in the subregion, to fully implement the measures renewed in paragraph 1 above, including as appropriate by enforcing the necessary rules and regulations and calls also upon the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI) to lend its full support within its capacities and mandate and further calls upon the French forces to support UNOCI in this regard, within the limits of their deployment and their capabilities ;

4. Urges all illegal armed combatants to lay down their arms immediately, encourages UNOCI, within its mandate and limits of capabilities and areas of deployment, to continue to assist the Ivorian Government in collecting and storing those arms and further calls upon the Ivorian authorities, including the National Commission to fight against the Proliferation and Illicit Traffic of Small Arms and Light Weapons, to ensure that those arms are neutralized or not illegally disseminated, in accordance with the ECOWAS Convention on Small Arms and light Weapons, their Ammunition and other Associated Materials ;

5. Recalls that UNOCI, within the monitoring of the arms embargo, is mandated to collect, as appropriate, arms and any related materiel brought into Côte d’Ivoire in violation of the measures imposed by paragraph 7 of resolution 1572 (2004), and to dispose of such arms and related materiel as appropriate ;

6. Expresses its deep concern about the presence of mercenaries in Côte d’Ivoire, notably from neighbouring countries, and calls upon the authorities of Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia to coordinate their action to solve this issue and further encourages UNOCI and the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), within their respective mandates, capabilities and areas of deployment, to assist respectively the Governments of Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia in monitoring their border, with particular attention to any cross border movement of combatants or transfer of arms ;

7. Reiterates the necessity for the Ivorian authorities to provide unhindered access to the Group of Experts, as well as UNOCI and the French Forces which support it, to equipment, sites and installations referred to in paragraph 2 (a) of resolution 1584 (2005), and to all weapons, ammunition and related materiel of all armed security forces, regardless of location, including the arms issued from the collection referred to in paragraph 4 above, when appropriate without notice, as set out in its resolutions 1739 (2007), 1880 (2009), 1933 (2010) and 1962 (2010) ;

8. Decides that the supply of vehicles to the Ivorian security forces shall be subject to the measures imposed by paragraph 7 of resolution 1572 (2004) ;

9. Decides that the exemption procedure set out in paragraph 8 (e) of resolution 1572 (2004) shall apply only to arms and related materiel, vehicles, and the provision of technical training and assistance in support of the Ivorian process of Security Sector Reform, pursuant to a formal request by the Ivorian Government and approved in advance by the Sanctions Committee ;

10. Underlines that it is fully prepared to impose targeted measures against persons to be designated by the Committee in accordance with paragraphs 9, 11 and 14 of resolution 1572 (2004) who are determined to be, among other things :

(a) A threat to the peace and national reconciliation process in Côte d’Ivoire, in particular by blocking the implementation of the peace process, as referred to in the Ouagadougou Political Agreement ;

(b) Attacking or obstructing the action of UNOCI, of the French forces which support it and of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Côte d’Ivoire ;

(c) Responsible for obstacles to the freedom of movement of UNOCI and of the French forces which support it ;

(d) Responsible for serious violations of human rights and international humanitarian law committed in Côte d’Ivoire ;

(e) Inciting publicly hatred and violence ;

(f) Acting in violation of the measures imposed by paragraph 1 above ;

11. Reiterates its readiness to impose sanctions against those who obstruct the electoral process, specifically the action of the Independent Electoral Commission and all other operators involved, and the proclamation and certification of the results of the Parliamentary elections ;

12. Requests all States concerned, in particular those in the subregion, to cooperate fully with the Sanctions Committee, and authorizes the Committee to request whatever further information it may consider necessary ;

13. Decides to extend the mandate of the Group of Experts as set out in paragraph 7 of resolution 1727 (2006) until 30 April 2012 and requests the Secretary-General to take the necessary measures to support its action ;

14. Requests the Group of Experts to submit a midterm report to the Committee by 15 October 2011 and to submit a final report as well as recommendations to the Security Council through the Committee 15 days before the end of its mandated period, on the implementation of the measures imposed by paragraphs 7, 9 and 11 of resolution 1572 (2004), paragraph 6 of resolution 1643 (2005) and paragraph 12 of resolution 1975 (2011),

15. Decides that the report of the Group of Experts, as referred to in paragraph 7 (e) of resolution 1727 (2006) may include, as appropriate, any information and recommendations relevant to the Committee’s possible additional designation of the individuals and entities described in paragraphs 9 and 11 of resolution 1572 (2004) and further recalls the Informal Working Group on General Issues of Sanctions report (S/2006/997) on best practices and methods, including paragraphs 21, 22, and 23 that discuss possible steps for clarifying methodological standards for monitoring mechanisms ;

16. Requests the Secretary-General to communicate as appropriate to the Security Council, through the Committee, information gathered by UNOCI and, where possible, reviewed by the Group of Experts, concerning the supply of arms and related materiel to Côte d’Ivoire ;

17. Requests also the French Government to communicate as appropriate to the Security Council, through the Committee, information gathered by the French forces and, where possible, reviewed by the Group of Experts, concerning the supply of arms and related materiel to Côte d’Ivoire ;

18. Requests also the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme to communicate as appropriate to the Security Council, through the Committee, information which, where possible, has been reviewed by the Group of Experts, concerning the production and illicit export of diamonds from Côte d’Ivoire and further decides to renew the exemptions set out by paragraph 16 and 17 of resolution 1893 (2009) with regard to the securing of samples of rough diamonds for scientific research purposes coordinated by the Kimberley Process ;

19. Encourages the Ivorian authorities to work with the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme to conduct a review and assessment of Côte d’Ivoire’s internal controls system for trade in rough diamonds and a comprehensive geologic study of Côte d’Ivoire’s potential diamond resources and production capacity, with a view to possibly modifying or lifting, as appropriate, the measures imposed by paragraph 6 of resolution 1643 (2005) ;

20. Encourages the Ivorian authorities to deploy customs and border control officials throughout the country, particularly in the north and the west, and encourages UNOCI, within its mandate, to assist the Ivorian authorities in the re establishment of normal customs and border control operation ;

21. Urges all States, relevant United Nations bodies and other organizations and interested parties, to cooperate fully with the Committee, the Group of Experts, UNOCI and the French forces, in particular by supplying any information at their disposal on possible violations of the measures imposed by paragraphs 7, 9 and 11 of resolution 1572 (2004), paragraph 6 of resolution 1643 (2005) and paragraph 12 of resolution 1975 (2011) as reiterated in paragraph 1 above ; further requests the Group of Experts to coordinate its activities as appropriate with all political actors ;

22. Recalls paragraph 7 of 1960 (2010) and paragraph 7 (b) of 1882 (2009), regarding sexual and gender-based violence and children in armed conflict, and welcomes the information-sharing between the Committee and the Special Representatives of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict and for Sexual Violence in Conflict, in accordance with their respective mandates and as appropriate ;

23. Urges further in this context that all Ivorian parties and all States, particularly those in the region, ensure :

– the safety of the members of the Group of Experts ;

– unhindered access by the Group of Experts, in particular to persons, documents and sites in order for the Group of Experts to execute its mandate ;

24. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

Minutes of the meeting

The President Mr. Osorio (Colombia) (spoke in Spanish) : Under rule 37 of the Council’s provisional rules of procedure, I invite the representative of Côte d’Ivoire to participate in this meeting.

The Security Council will now begin its consideration of the item on its agenda.

Members of the Council have before them document S/2011/273, containing the text of a draft resolution submitted by France.

I wish to draw the attention of Council members to documents S/2011/271 and S/2011/272, respectively containing letters dated 20 April 2011 from the Chair of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1572 (2004) concerning Côte d’Ivoire addressed to the President of the Security Council.

It is my understanding that the Council is ready to proceed to the vote on the draft resolution before it.

A vote was taken by show of hands.

In favour :

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, China, Colombia, France, Gabon, Germany, India, Lebanon, Nigeria, Portugal, Russian Federation, South Africa, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and United States of America.

The President (spoke in Spanish) : There were 15 votes in favour. The draft resolution has been adopted unanimously as resolution 1980 (2011).

I now give the floor to the representative of Côte d’Ivoire.

Mr. Bamba (Côte d’Ivoire) (spoke in French) : My delegation welcomes the adoption by the Security Council of resolution 1980 (2011), which reintroduces the embargo on arms imports into Côte d’Ivoire and renews the travel ban and financial freeze imposed on a number of political actors linked to the Ivorian crisis, in accordance with the relevant provisions of preceding Council resolutions on the matter, particularly resolutions 1572 (2004), 1643 (2005), 1946 (2010) and 1975 (2011).

We believe that the sanctions regime, extended by one year to 30 April 2012, is necessary in particular to consolidate the end of the state of belligerence in which Côte d’Ivoire has suffered over the past four months. Indeed, like other nations, my country wishes to strive for socio-economic development in a climate of peace and security. We cannot allow those efforts to be undermined by an environment of large-scale illicit arms flows.

My delegation also believes that the resolution, which very explicitly urges all illegal armed combatants to lay down their arms, should contribute significantly to the restoration of peace and security in Côte d’Ivoire. Among other things, the resolution encourages the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI) to continue to assist the Ivorian Government in collecting and storing arms. My country, for its part, will take all measures necessary to prevent the future distribution of weapons. Of great importance to us is the fact that the concerns of my Government have been taken into consideration with respect to possible exemptions submitted to the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1572 (2004) in the context of the vast security sector reform programme.

Two weeks after the departure of Mr. Gbagbo from the seat of authority he had usurped following his presidential electoral defeat on 28 November 2010, life in Côte d’Ivoire is slowly but surely returning to normal. The President of the Republic, His Excellency Mr. Alassane Ouattara, and his Government are currently trying to address urgent matters in order to improve the daily lives of our people. Among his primary concerns is the restoration of public order and security, particularly in the economic capital of Abidjan.

Some rapid progress has been seen as the last bastions of insecurity have been eliminated, particularly in Abobo and Yopougon. First, the police stations and gendarmerie brigades have mostly returned to service, although they are suffering significant equipment and logistical shortages. Additional joint patrols with UNOCI forces are of great comfort to the people, who are beginning to circulate freely once again.

Secondly, the humanitarian situation is now being managed more effectively. Health care and medicine are being offered free of charge in all hospitals and public health facilities. Humanitarian organizations enjoy greater freedom of movement thanks to gradually improving security and are able more easily to provide assistance to those in need. The disposal of bodies and street-cleaning have been effective in reducing the dangers of epidemics. The displaced are returning to their homes. Water and electricity are now available throughout the country.

Thirdly, administrative, economic and social activities have resumed. All ministries and principal State services have returned to work. All the major banks are running and open to the public, particularly in order to pay salaries for March and April. Public transportation is running normally and most businesses have reopened. With respect to school, classes are slowly resuming and teachers are busy assessing their facilities following the looting of classrooms, and are organizing the resumption of courses.

In addition to these immediate priority challenges, the most important for the President of the Republic, his Government and the entire Ivorian people to address is that of national reconciliation. Indeed, given the deep damage to the social fabric and national cohesion wrought by 10 years of political and military crises in our country — with all the concomitant misunderstandings, divisions, intolerance, unjustified hatreds, indiscriminate violence, grief and trauma suffered to various degrees by every Ivorian family — it is unthinkable that national reconstruction can be reliably achieved without ownership of that noble task by all sons and daughters of Côte d’Ivoire working together in solidarity.

President Ouattara, mindful of all that is at stake, has decided to establish in the coming weeks a truth and reconciliation commission modeled on that created by President Mandela in South Africa following the fall of apartheid. In fact, President Ouattara believes that the reconciliation so devoutly desired in Côte d’Ivoire will require the truth surrounding all the crimes and atrocities that have been perpetrated.

In addition, justice must be rendered to the victims and their relatives so as to prevent impunity. Only then will forgiveness play a role and lead to the necessary reconciliation among ourselves.

The establishment in the near future of a broad-based Government that includes all political forces and members of civil society also reflects this will to achieve national reconciliation.

Any reconciliation is a process ; the reconciliation that we in Côte d’Ivoire hope for is no different. But I would say that our process is part of the emergence of democracy in our country, wherein the Ivorian people have chosen a new President after a free, fair and transparent election. National reconciliation, no doubt, will lay a solid foundation to allow the rule of law to take root in Ivorian society. That is, at any rate, the desire of the Ivorian people and the will of President Alassane Ouattara, who will spare no effort to achieve this.

In conclusion, I would like to express my Government’s satisfaction at being able to soon welcome in Côte d’Ivoire a working mission from the Department of Peacekeeping Operations. We hope that this visit will provide an opportunity for exchanges allowing us to together take stock of the tremendous challenges that remain to be overcome in the areas of peacebuilding, security, reconstruction and national reconciliation.

The President (spoke in Spanish) : There are no further speakers inscribed on my list. The Security Council has thus concluded the present stage of its consideration of the item on its agenda. The Security Council will remain seized of the matter.

The meeting rose at 11.25 a.m.